Results of the 2024 European election

By Manuel Müller.
This text was continuously updated from the European elections on 6-9 June until the constitution of the new Parliament on 16 July 2024 and now permanently represents the situation at the time of the constitutive session. Last update: 17 July 2024.


Left G/EFA S&D RE EPP ECR ID/PfE ESN NI
EP 2019 406814897187627627
outgoing 3772139102176694961
EP 2024 46531367718878842533

Results 2024.

Historical results.

Europe went to the polls on 6-9 June, and all the national election results can be found on the European Parliament’s website. However, it was not clear immediately after the election how many seats each political group would actually have: numerous individual national parties only decided which group they would join in the weeks following the election.

On the one hand, uncertainty arose from parties entering the European Parliament for the first time. While some of them had already publicly committed themselves to a political group before the election, others had not. On the other hand, there were also some parties that had been in the Parliament for some time but were open to a change of political group.

New groups

In addition, some parties that were new to the Parliament or were previously non-attached tried to form new, independent political groups. According to the European Parliament’s Rules of Procedure, this required at least 23 MEPs from seven different member states.

A new far-right group called Patriots for Europe was announced in late June and officially formed on 8 July. It attracted most of the former members of the ID group, replacing it de facto. An attempt by the German AfD to form another new far-right group called The Sovereignists failed in late June, but was successful in July, now under the name Europe of Sovereign Nations. By contrast, a possible new left-conservative group around the German BSW and the Italian M5S was confirmed to have failed on 3 July.

This article shows the distribution of seats when the new Parliament was constituted on 16 July 2024. In a few cases, parties had not yet finally decided at that time which parliamentary group they would join. In principle, it is possible to change political groups and even form new ones at any time later in the electoral term.

For more general information on European political parties and groups in the European Parliament, click here.

The overview

The following table breaks down the distribution of seats between the political groups in the new European Parliament by individual national parties. Parties that entered the Parliament for the first time or for which a change of political group seemed plausible shortly before or after the election are marked in colour. A second overview table below explains the situation of all marked parties in more detail.




Left G/EFA S&D RE EPP ECR ID/PfE ESN NI
EP 2019 406814897187627627
outgoing 3772139102176694961
EP 2024 46531367718878842533

Left G/EFA S&D RE EPP ECR ID/PfE ESN NI
DE 3 Linke
1 Tier
12 Grüne
3 Volt
14 SPD 5 FDP
3 FW
29 Union
1 Familie
1 ÖDP


14 AfD 6 BSW
2 Partei
1 PdF
1 AfD
FR 9 LFI
5 EELV 13 PS 13 RE 6 LR 4 ex-REC
30 RN 1 REC
IT 8 M5S
2 SI
4 EV 21 PD
8 FI
1 SVP
24 FdI 8 Lega

ES 2 Pod
1 Sumar
1 Bildu
1 ERC
1 BNG
1 CatComù
1 Comp
20 PSOE 1 PNV
22 PP
6 Vox
3 SALF
1 Junts
PL

3 Lewica 1 PL2050
21 KO
2 KP
20 PiS
3 Konf 3 Konf
RO
1 Ştefănuţă 11 PSD
2 USR
1 PMP
8 PNL
2 UDMR
6 AUR

2 SOS
NL 1 PvdD
4 GL
2 Volt
4 PvdA 4 VVD
3 D66
3 CDA
2 BBB
1 NSC
1 SGP 6 PVV

BE 2 PTB 1 Groen
1 Ecolo
2 Vooruit
2 PS
1 O-VLD
3 MR
1 LE
2 CD&V
1 CSP
3 N-VA 3 VB

CZ
1 Piráti


2 STAN
2 TOP09
1 KDU-ČSL
3 ODS 7 ANO
2 Přísaha
1 SPD 2 Stačilo
EL 4 Syriza
3 PASOK
7 ND 2 EL 1 FL
2 KKE
1 PE
1 NIKI
HU

2 DK

7 TISZA

10 Fidesz
1 KDNP
1 MHM
PT 1 BE
1 CDU

8 PS 2 IL 7 PSD
2 Chega

SE 2 V 3 MP 5 S 2 C
1 L
4 M
1 KD
3 SD


AT
2 Grüne 5 SPÖ 2 Neos 5 ÖVP
6 FPÖ

BG

2 BSP 3 DPS
2 PP
5 GERB
1 DB
1 ITN

3 V
DK 1 Enhl. 3 SF 3 S 2 V
1 M
1 RV
1 K
1 LA
1 DD 1 DF

SK


6 PS 1 KDH

1 REP 5 Smer
1 Hlas
1 REP
FI 3 Vas 2 Vihreät 2 SDP 2 Kesk
1 SFP
4 Kok
1 PS


IE 2 SF
1 Flanagan

1 Labour 4 FF
1 McNamara
1 II

4 FG



HR
1 Možemo 4 SDP
6 HDZ 1 DP


LT
1 DSVL 2 LSDP 1 LRLS
1 LP
3 TS-LKD 1 LLRA
1 LVŽS

1 TTS
LV
1 Prog 1 SDPS 1 LA 2 JV
2 NA
1 LRA
1 LPV


SI
1 Vesna 1 SD 2 GS 4 SDS
1 NSi




EE

2 SDE 1 RE
1 KE
2 Isamaa 1 Madison


CY 1 AKEL
1 DIKO

2 DISY 1 ELAM

1 Fidías
LU
1 Gréng 1 LSAP 1 DP 2 CSV 1 ADR


MT

3 PL
3 PN




The following table provides a more detailed overview of the situation of parties entering Parliament for the first time or whose future political group was unclear for other reasons at the time of the European elections. Parties that have publicly confirmed their group affiliation after the European elections are marked with colour, their new group is shown in bold.

State Party Seats From To Comments
DE AfD 15 NI
(ID)
ESN
NI
Following a series of scandals, the AfD was expelled from the ID group in May 2024. Hoping to rejoin the group after the election, the party expelled one especially controversial member from its delegation, but was still not readmitted. It therefore started preparations for the formation of a new far-right group, allegedly named “The Sovereignists”. For this, the AfD needed partners from at least six other member states. However, some of these potential partners were so radical that parts of the AfD had reservations about the formation of such a group. As an alternative, AfD leader Alice Weidel expressed interest in joining the new PfE group around Hungary’s Fidesz, the Czech ANO and Austria’s FPÖ. However, since the PfE became the de-facto successor of the ID group, this option was also closed. Finally, in early July, the possibility of a new AfD-centred group resurfaced and finally led to the formation of the “Europe of Sovereign Nations” group. Maximilian Krah, the AfD member that was expelled from the party delegation, remained non-attached.
DE BSW 6 new NI The BSW tried but failed in its attempt to form an own parliamentary group. It will therefore remain non-attached
DE FW 3 RE RE The FW have moved to the right since the 2019 European elections. However, rumours of a possible switch to the ECR have not materialised.
DE Volt 3 G/EFA G/EFA After the election, Volt’s three German and two Dutch MEPs negotiated a possible switch to RE. However, on recommendation of the MEPs, party members finally decided to stay in the G/EFA.
DE Tier 1 new
(Left)
Left The party won one seat in the 2019 election, and was part of the Left group until its only MEP left the party and the group. As had been expected, its new MEP joined the Left group again.
DE ÖDP 1 G/EFA EPP The ÖDP participated in the reconstitution of the G/EFA group, but then switched to the EPP group in early July.
DE PdF 1 new NI The small party is ideologically closest to the centre-left. However, it refuses to be co-opted by any political camp and does not want to join any existing political group. As it lacks the partners to realise its stated aim of forming its own group, it will remain non-attached.
FR RN 30 ID PfE The RN was not initially involved in the foundation of the new PfE group around Hungary’s Fidesz, Austria’s FPÖ and Czechia’s ANO. However, it joined the group at its inaugural meeting on 8 July, the day after the second round of the French legislative elections.
FR LFI 9 Left Left The LFI was seen as a possible target for a new left-conservative group with the German BSW, but ultimately remained in the Left group.
FR LR 6 EPP EPP In the run-up to the French legislative elections at the end of June, the conservative LR was internally split about a possible electoral alliance with the ID member party RN. The German CDU/CSU reacted by announcing that it would seek to expel LR from the EPP if such an alliance were to take place. However, this did not materialise.
FR ex-REC 4 ECR ECR Before the election, the Reconquête party was represented in the European Parliament by an MEP who had defected from the RN and joined the ECR group. After the election, four of the five newly elected MEPs were expelled from the party following an internal conflict. The four expelled MEPs joined the ECR. The remaining Reconquête MEP later became a member of the new ESN group.
FR REC 1 ECR ESN Before the election, the Reconquête party was represented in the European Parliament by an MEP who had defected from the RN and joined the ECR group. After the election, four of the five newly elected MEPs were expelled from the party following an internal conflict about a possible cooperation with the RN. The four expelled MEPs joined the ECR. The remaining Reconquête MEP later became a member of the new ESN group around the German AfD.
IT M5S 8 NI Left The Movimento 5 Stelle, which has evolved in recent years from a populist protest party into a NATO-sceptical centre-left party, negotiated with the Greens/EFA group before the election, but the talks remained unsuccessful. A possible new group with the German BSW was seen as a possible alternative. Instead, the M5S joined the Left group in early July.
IT Lega 8 ID PfE The Lega has joined the new PfE group around Hungary’s Fidesz, Austria’s FPÖ and Czechia’s ANO.
IT AVS 6 new Left
G/EFA
The AVS electoral alliance included both candidates close to EV (Greens/EFA) and SI (Left). Due to the Italian electoral system (with open regional lists and the possibility of candidates standing in more than one constituency), it was not clear until after the election how many of the elected MEPs would be in each group.
ES Vox 6 ECR PfE Vox participated in the reconstitution of the ECR group in early July, but later switched to the new PfE.
ES Sumar 1 new Left This is the first time that the Sumar party alliance has stood in a European election. Most of the candidates on the list are members of parties belonging to either the Greens/EFA or the Left group in the European Parliament. The lead candidate on the list, who was not a party member, joined the Left group after the election.
ES SALF 3 new NI

The newly founded right-wing populist voters’ association SALF did not say before the election which group it would join. In early July, SALF accused Vox of preventing it from joining the ECR group. Vox denied this. When Vox itself left the ECR group shortly afterwards, SALF did not immediately become a member. Instead, the it was seen as a possible target for the new ESN group around the German AfD. However, SALF did not join this group either. In mid-July, SALF declared that it was negotiating with ‘at least three groups’ about joining. However, at the time the Parliament was constituted, the party was still non-attached. 
ES Junts 1 NI NI The non-attached Catalan separatist party Junts was seen as a possible target for a new group around the German BSW, which did not materialise. At the time of the constitutive session of the Parliament, the elected deputy, Toni Comín, had not yet taken up his mandate because, according to Spanish electoral law, he would have to take an oath on the Spanish Constitution and travel to Spain, where he is wanted on criminal charges. Comín is challenging these rules in the European Court of Justice.
PL PiS 20 ECR ECR PiS explored the creation of a new political group with parties from Central and Eastern Europe and considered joining the new PfE group, but ultimately decided to remain in the ECR group.
PL Konf 6 new ESN
NI
The hardline Eurosceptic Konfederacja has entered the Parliament for the first time. Its predecessor parties had relations with the ID, but these were always difficult. Joining the ECR was even less likely, as Poland’s PiS is already a member there. In the end, three of the six Konfederacja MEPs joined the new far-right group around the German AfD. The other three remain non-affiliated by the time of the constitutive session of the Parliament, although it seemed possible that they would try to join the PfE group at a later time.
RO AUR 6 new ECR The far-right party AUR had announced that it would join the ECR – provided that Hungary’s Fidesz did not. This was confirmed after the election.
RO SOS 2 new NI The pro-Russian far-right party S.O.S. România announced its intention to join ID shortly after the elections. However, S.O.S. did not participate in the inaugural meeting of the new PfE group that has replaced ID. It was also seen as a possible target for a possible new far-right group around the German AfD. However, AfD representatives declared that they would not accept S.O.S. into their group. S.O.S. is therefore certain to remain non-affiliated
RO PMP 1 EPP RE The PMP has switched from EPP to RE.
NL PVV 6 ID PfE As most other former ID member parties, the PVV has joined the new PfE group.
NL VVD 4 RE RE As the VVD has formed a coalition with the far-right PVV (ID) at national level, the RE group announced before the election that it would vote on whether to expel the VVD. The vote was originally scheduled for 10 June, the day after the election. After the election, however, the decision was postponed, and finally it became clear that no vote would be held. VVD will thus remain in the RE group. If an expulsion had taken place, the VVD might have tried to join the EPP or the ECR. A similar case concerns the Swedish Liberalerna.
NL Volt 2 new G/EFA After the election, Volt’s three German and two Dutch MEPs negotiated a possible switch to RE. However, on recommendation of the MEPs, party members finally decided to stay in the G/EFA.
NL BBB 2 new EPP As it had announced before the election, the BBB joined the EPP.
NL NSC 1 new EPP As it had announced before the election, the NSC joined the EPP.
BE N-VA 3 ECR ECR
The N-VA “no longer felt entirely at home in the ECR” and tried to join the EPP. However, there were reservations within the EPP because of the N-VA’s Flemish-separatist positions. By the time of the constitutive session, the N-VA was still a member of the ECR group.
BE VB 3 ID PfE As most other former ID member parties, VB joined the new PfE group.
BE LE 1 EPP RE After the election, LE switched to the RE group.
CZ ANO 7 RE PfE ANO left the RE group shortly after the election and later announced the formation of a new group with Hungary’s Fidesz and Austrias’s FPÖ.
CZ ODS 3 ECR ECR The national-conservative ODS works closely with two Czech EPP parties and is trying to build bridges between the EPP and the ECR in the European Parliament. If the ECR had admitted Hungary’s Fidesz, the ODS could have seen this as a reason to change its parliamentary group. However, this possibility did not materialise.
CZ Přísaha 2 new PfE Přísaha announced its intention to join the ECR, but its accession was blocked by the ODS. Finally, Přísaha became a member of the new PfE group. At the end of 2023, the party had still seen the EPP as its future group.
CZ Stačilo 2 Left NI The left-wing, but socially conservative Stačilo wanted to join a possible new left-conservative group around Germany’s BSW. Since this new group failed, it decided to remain non-attached.
CZ SPD 1 ID ESN SPD was a member of the ID group but did not join the new PfE group, which was co-founded by another Czech party, ANO. Instead, SPD announced that it would join the new far-right group around the German AfD.
EL Syriza 4 Left Left Parts of the Syriza leadership would have liked to switch to the S&D group, which was open to the idea in principle. However, the proposal was controversial within the party and ultimately did not materialise.
EL PE 1 new NI
The left-populist PE won a seat in the Parliament for the first time. It was seen as a possible member of the Left group as well as a plausible target for the failed new left-conservative group around Germany’s BSW. In the end, PE remained non-attached.
EL NIKI 1 new NI The Christian national-conservative NIKI has announced that it will remain non-attached. It was seen as a potential target for the new group around Germany’s AfD, but did not become a member.
EL FL 1 new PfE Before the election, the FL leader declared that she identified most with the ECR group. After the election, however, she joined the new PfE group instead.
HU Fidesz 10 NI PfE Before the election, Fidesz announced that it would like to join the ECR, which was supported by some current ECR members (PiS) but strongly opposed by others (ODS, SD, AUR and parts of PiS). After the election, Fidesz declared not to seek ECR membership any more because of the presence of Romania’s AUR. ID, on the other hand, had shown itself to be open to admitting Fidesz and was therefore a more plausible destination – especially after the expulsion of the German AfD, with which Fidesz does not want to cooperate. Finally, Fidesz announced the formation of a new group with the Austrian FPÖ and the Czech ANO. This group has de facto replaced the ID group.
HU TISZA 7 new EPP As had been expected, the centre-right TISZA party, led by Péter Magyar, has joined the EPP group. This indirectly led to the KDNP leaving the group.
HU KDNP 1 EPP PfE The KDNP is a small party close to Fidesz that always runs on a joint list with it in elections. Unlike Fidesz, however, the KDNP remained in the EPP in 2021. As TISZA joined the EPP after the European elections, the KDNP announced that it will leave the group. Eventually, it has joined the new PfE group together with Fidesz.
HU MHM 1 new ESN The far-right MHM wanted to set up its own political group in the European Parliament. Ultimately, it became a member of the new group around the German AfD.
PT Chega 2 new PfE Chega has entered the Parliament for the first time, but it already was a member of the ID party. After the election, it announced that it would join the new group around Fidesz, ANO and FPÖ.
SE L 1 RE RE
The Liberalerna cooperate with the far-right SD (ECR) at national level. The Swedish Centerpartiet therefore called for them to be excluded from the RE group. In this case, the Liberalerna could have sought refuge in the EPP group. However, as in the similar case of the Dutch VVD, the expulsion did not take place.
AT FPÖ 6 ID PfE After the election, the FPÖ announced that it would form a new group (Patriots for Europe) with the Czech ANO and the Hungarian Fidesz. Later, almost all other ID members also joined this new group.
BG V 3 new ESN Vǎzrashdane had been a member of the ID party since the beginning of 2024. After the election, however, Vǎzrashdane did not join the new PfE group that replaced ID, but pushed for the formation of a new far-right group with the German AfD.
BG PP 2 new RE The liberal PP party won seats for the first time in the European Parliament and unsurprisingly joined the RE group. PP ran as part of the centrist PP-DB alliance together with the centre-right DB, whose MEP belongs to the EPP.
BG DB 1 EPP EPP DB ran as part of the centrist PP-DB alliance. While PP joined the RE group, DB’s elected MEP already belonged to the EPP before the election and remained there.
BG ITN 1 new ECR As it had announced before the election, ITN has joined the ECR.
DK LA 1 new EPP As it had announced before the election, the LA has joined the EPP.
DK DD 1 new ECR As they had announced before the election, the DD have joined the ECR.
DK DF 1 ID PfE Like most other ID member parties, the DF has joined the new PfE group.
SK Smer 5 NI NI
The Slovak governing party Smer and its coalition partner Hlas were suspended by the S&D in 2023 and have been non-attached since. They were seen as plausible targets for a new left-conservative group with the German BSW or a new Central and Eastern European group with the Polish PiS and the Czech ANO, which both did not materialise. Smer and Hlas themselves applied to return to the S&D, but the suspension was not lifted.
SK REP 2 NI ESN
NI
One of the two MEPs of the party has joined the new far-right group around the German AfD. The other MEP was not admitted to the group and remained non-attached.
SK Hlas 1 new NI The Slovak governing party Smer and its coalition partner Hlas were suspended by the S&D in 2023 and have been non-attached since. They were seen as plausible targets for a new left-conservative group with the German BSW or a new Central and Eastern European group with the Polish PiS and the Czech ANO, which both did not materialise. Smer and Hlas themselves applied to return to the S&D, but the suspension was not lifted.
IE II 1 new RE II represents right-wing populist views, and its leader has participated in an ECR event in 2023. However, the party’s elected MEP ruled out joining the ECR. He initially negotiated with the G/EFA but ultimately joined the RE group.
IE McNamara 1 new RE McNamara is a former member of the Irish Labour Party but represents conservative positions on gender and environmental policy. He could therefore have been a plausible target for the failed new group around the German BSW. The S&D or the ECR might have been conceivable alternatives. Eventually, however, he joined the RE group.
HR DP 1 new ECR DP had announced its intention to join ID before the election, but then became a member of the ECR group.
LT LVŽS 1 G/EFA ECR The green-conservative LVŽS switched from the Greens/EFA to the ECR group after the election.
LT LLRA 1 ECR ECR LLRA was seen as a possible target for a new Central and Eastern European group with the Polish PiS and the Czech ANO. Since this new group did not materialise, it will remain in the ECR.
LT TTS 1 new ESN The TTS had announced its intention to join the ECR, but did not participate in its inaugural meeting. Instead, it joined the new far-right group around the German AfD.
LV LRA 1 new ECR It was unclear which group the regionalist LRA would join. It joined the ECR shortly after the election.
LV LPV 1 new PfE The right-wing populist, rather NATO-friendly LPV could have fit ideologically with the ECR, but instead joined the new PfE group.
SI SDS 4 EPP EPP SDS was mentioned as a possible target for a new political group of Central and Eastern European parties with the Polish PiS and the Czech ANO. However, the party itself dismissed the idea of leaving the EPP group as “fake news”. Ultimately, the new CEE group did not materialise anyway.
EE Madison 1 ID ECR Jaak Madison was the only candidate elected on the list of EKRE (ID), but left the party a few days after the election. He expressed his interest in joining a different group if he received a “better offer”, explicitly mentioning EPP and ECR. However, the Estonian EPP member party Isamaa had some reservations against accepting him. In the end, Madison joined the ECR.
CY ELAM 1 new ECR ELAM was already close to the ECR before the election and joined it as expected.
CY Fidías 1 new NI YouTuber Fidías Panayiótou has won a seat as an independent candidate. According to himself he tried to form his own group, but did not find enough partners. He therefore organised an online poll to decide whether he should join the G/EFA group or remain non-attached.

Pictures: all graphs: Manuel Müller.

3 Kommentare:

  1. Hello I’m afraid there’s a mistake in your seat distribution for Romania.

    In total there are 33 seats not 32.

    The seat missing is for AUR. Therefore ECR likely has +1 in both baseline and dynamic scenarios.

    Verian caused a lot of confusion with this also.

    AntwortenLöschen
    Antworten
    1. Manuel Müller14/6/24 18:00

      Thanks for pointing this out, I have corrected the mistake. (The error was only in the table; the overall ECR numbers were correct.)

      Löschen
  2. https://www.euractiv.com/section/politics/news/bulgarias-we-continue-the-change-join-liberal-renew/
    Bulgaria’s ‘We Continue the Change’ join liberal Renew

    AntwortenLöschen

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